Death By a Thousand Tax Cuts: Exploiting Trump’s Biggest Vulnerability

When it comes to beating a Republican presidential candidate, some things in politics haven’t changed as much as we think. In 2024, one of Democrats’ best weapons against Trump is to bring back an oldie-but-goodie attack against Republican nominees: he would be a president for the rich, not average Americans.

This Blueprint poll is informed by a sample of 1,039 respondents, fielded on April 12 and April 13, and weighted to education, gender, race, respondent quality, and 2020 election results. The margin of error is +/- 4.5. The full toplines can be found here and crosstabs here.

TOP TAKEAWAYS

✓  The message that Trump only advocates for the interests of the rich at the expense of the working and middle class is a winning message; Democrats, independents, moderates, higher-than-average-income, and college-educated voters all find it appealing
✓  By a two-to-one margin, voters say they will vote for the candidate who will best represent the interests of the American middle class even if it means they might have to pay higher taxes
✓  58% of voters agree that Trump’s tax cuts benefited people who are richer than they are—including 84% of Democrats, 67% of college-educated voters, 82% of Haley voters, 59% of independents, 61% of moderates, and 60% of voters in households that earn above the median income
✓  53% of voters—including 91% of Democrats, 78% of Haley voters, and 56% of independents—are worried that Trump will pass tax policies that favor the very rich but not middle-class Americans
✓ Biden’s pledge to ensure the rich pay their fair share to reduce the deficit is a top-performing message

New polling from Blueprint shows that, when it comes to beating a Republican presidential candidate, some things in politics haven’t changed as much as we think. In 2024, one of Democrats’ best weapons against Trump is to bring back an oldie-but-goodie attack against Republican nominees: he would be a president for the rich, not average Americans.

Twelve years after Mitt Romney’s infamous “47 percent” gaffe, our newest polling indicates that the same line of attack that Barack Obama used against Romney—that the Republican presidential candidate is a rich guy whose economic and tax policies help billionaires and large corporations—is still galvanizing to Democrats and appealing to the crucial persuadable voters that would comprise a winning Biden coalition in the fall. This populist economic message is one to prominently center as the general election season progresses. This is true even among the higher income voters that are increasingly gravitating into the Democratic coalition. Democrats are in have your cake and eat it too situation: Haley voters and voters earning more than the median income are skeptical that Trump will have their economic interests in mind.

This poll builds on previously released Blueprint findings:

  • Our survey on the deficit showed that Biden’s approach to reducing it—namely, making the wealthy and corporations pay their fair share—is popular, while Trump and Republicans’ approach to the deficit, which includes tax cuts for corporations and the very wealthy, is not.
  • In another recent poll, we found “Trump will let rich tax cheats off the hook” and “Trump would cut taxes for the rich but not working- and middle-class families” ranked among the top five voter concerns about the former president. There does not appear to be a significant class divide on this issue. When we asked voters if they were concerned that Trump would cut taxes for the rich but not working- and middle-class Americans, 58% of those in households making less than $50,000 a year said they are concerned about it, while 56% of those in households making $100,000+ a year said the same.
  • And our first poll revealed that 62% of voters believe the Republican Party focuses “a lot” on the rich.

KEY FINDINGS

A Majority of Voters Believe—and Don’t Like—That Trump’s Policies Mostly Benefit Rich People

There’s broad consensus that Trump’s policies mostly benefit wealthier people—an opportunity that can be taken advantage of as the general election approaches. 51% of voters—including 92% of Democrats, 61% of moderates, 52% of independents, 58% of college-educated voters, and 81% of Haley voters—are worried that Trump will advocate for the interests of the very rich but not for working- and middle-class Americans. 

Additionally, 52% of voters are worried that Trump will pass tax policies that favor the very rich but not middle-class Americans. That majority includes 91% of Democrats, 64% of moderates, 64% of Black or Hispanic voters under 45, 56% of college-educated voters, 53% of independents, 50% of non-college-educated voters, and 79% of Haley voters.

Similarly, 58% of voters agree that Trump’s tax cuts have benefited people who are richer than they are. That includes 67% of college-educated voters, 84% of Democrats, 82% of Haley voters, 60% of independents, 58% of moderates, and 60% of voters in households making above the median income. 

When asked who they think benefited the most from Trump’s overall economic policies, 56% of voters say that the beneficiaries were people who are richer than they are. That figure includes 93% of Democrats, 56% of independents, 65% of moderates, 58% of college-educated voters, 74% of Haley voters, and 50% of voters making more than the median household income. In contrast, just 37% of voters think Biden’s overall economic policies benefit people who are richer than they are.     

Finally, a significantly higher share of voters are worried that Trump would implement policies that only benefit the very rich than are worried that Biden would implement policies that only benefit poor Americans. When asked, “Which are you more worried about: that Joe Biden would implement policies that will only benefit poor Americans or that Donald Trump would implement policies that will only benefit the very rich?” 55% said the latter.  

Biden Has Work to Do on Differentiating Himself from Trump on Taxes

While voters clearly believe that Trump will pass tax policy that favors the rich, they do not yet associate Biden as strongly with the opposite position: 41% of voters are worried that Trump will raise taxes for households making less than $400,000 per year, while 56% of voters are worried that Biden will raise taxes for working- and middle-class families.

Troublingly, that 56% figure includes 55% of independents, 54% of those in households making less than the median income (as well as 59% of voters making more than that), and 58% of non-college-educated voters. 45% of moderates, 42% of Black or Hispanic voters under 45, and 25% of Democrats are also worried about Biden raising taxes for working- and middle-class families. 

The Biden campaign has more work to do to convince voters that he is the only candidate who has the backs of the working and middle class. Biden needs to more clearly differentiate his tax policy from Trump’s to assuage the fear that Biden would raise taxes on working- and middle-class people. 

Especially concerning is that fewer voters are worried that Trump would raise taxes for working- and middle-class families than are worried about Biden doing so: 51% of voters—including 56% of independents, 62% of moderates, and just 13% of Republicans—are worried that Trump would raise taxes for working- and middle-class families. Biden is up against pervasive and long-standing assumptions that Democrats tend to raise taxes across the board, not just on the wealthy.     

Playing the Hits: Voters Still Like Obama’s 2012 Message

When it comes to economic messaging that resonates across the electorate, Obama’s populism-inflected 2012 messages still go over well in 2024. When asked to pick their favorite statements about the economy in a comparative preference test between Obama and Biden messaging, without being told who said it, the two most commonly selected by voters were from Obama during the final stage of his reelection bid: 

  • “When faced with economic challenges, we must always bet on American workers. Time and time again, they have demonstrated their resilience, skills, and ability to adapt to changing circumstances. The strength of our nation lies in the hardworking people who drive innovation and growth every day.” This quote was selected 65% of the time. 
  • And: “I’m fighting for the hardworking people of this country—those on Social Security, veterans, students, soldiers, and everyday Americans who pay their taxes but may not earn enough to get by. If they succeed, I believe our nation will succeed. That’s why I’m asking for your vote and the opportunity to continue serving as your president.” This was selected 64% of the time.  

But notably, another compelling message—tied for the third-most-popular message and selected 62% of the time—is a Biden quote that made the case for the value of ensuring that the rich are contributing their fair share to deficit reduction: “Now let me speak to the question of fundamental fairness for all Americans. I’ve been delivering real results in fiscally responsible ways. We’ve already cut the federal deficit—we’ve already cut the federal deficit by over $1 trillion. I signed a bipartisan deal to cut another trillion dollars in the next decade. It’s my goal to cut the federal deficit another $3 trillion by making big corporations and the very wealthy finally beginning to pay their fair share.”

It’s important to recognize that Biden’s message on tax fairness and deficit reduction has power similar to top-testing Obama-era Democratic economic messaging—a finding that may be surprising to those who feel that Democrats currently lack an economic communications approach that matches prior successes.

A separate test of pro-Biden messages found approaches that are particularly compelling to voters include, “President Biden believes no billionaire should pay a lower tax rate than a firefighter, a teacher, a sanitation worker, or a nurse. Everyone should pay their fair share, with the wealthiest Americans and big corporations finally contributing what they rightfully owe” (69%), “Under President Biden’s tax plan, nobody earning less than $400,000 will pay an additional penny in federal taxes. Joe Biden is looking out for the middle class, not the millionaires and billionaires” (62%), and “When Donald Trump was president, he tried to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which would’ve meant eliminating protections for pre-existing conditions. Joe Biden has taken on big pharmaceutical companies to lower the price of prescription drugs” (56%).

Voters Are Willing to Support Candidates Who Will Raise Their Taxes

When asked whether they agree or disagree with the statement “I will vote for the candidate who will best represent the interests of the American middle class even if it means I might have to pay higher taxes,” 43% of voters agree and 22% disagree. Unsurprisingly, Democrats are much more likely to agree than Republicans. College-educated voters are more likely to agree (57% agree) than  those without a college degree (37% agree). Crucially for Biden, 46% of Haley voters agree, while just 20% of Haley voters disagree. Among voters in households making more than the median income, 48% agree with the statement, while 21% disagree. This suggests that economic populism won’t risk alienating the higher income, higher education Haley voters Biden needs to pull into his camp. 

This result is in line with a question that appears earlier in the survey, in which respondents say which view of the economy is closer to theirs: 

  • “Cutting taxes for businesses and job creators helps everyone because they invest in jobs for the middle class” or
  • “We should invest in the middle class to create a solid base for economic growth and opportunity”

On this question, 65% of voters overall prefer the second framework (investing in the middle class), while only 35% prefer the first (cutting taxes on businesses and job creators). The 65% includes 67% of voters in households earning less than the median income and 63% of those in households earning more than the median income. Voters of all incomes are willing to pay more in taxes if they feel that they are creating a strong middle-class base for economic growth. 

The Income Divide on Tax Policy Isn’t What One Might Expect

Haley voters are more likely than average to signal opposition to Trump’s tax policies and openness to Biden’s tax-the-rich rhetoric and policies. Because Haley voters are wealthier and are more likely to have a college degree than voters overall—62% of Haley voters earn more than the median household income, compared to 50% of voters overall; 46% are college-educated, compared to 36% of voters overall—this suggests that voters of higher socioeconomic status are supportive of economically populist rhetoric and policy stances. 

For example, in our poll: 

  • 74% of Haley voters say Biden’s proposal of more than $4.5 trillion in new taxes targeting corporations and the ultrawealthy had their economic interests in mind, compared to just 51% of voters overall.
  • Only 24% of Haley voters believe Trump’s signature tax cut bill that lowered corporate tax rates had their economic interests in mind, compared to 42% of voters overall. Similarly, just 28% of Haley voters say Trump lowering the corporate tax rate from 35% to 21% had their economic interests in mind, versus 45% of all voters.
  • 83% of Haley voters think Biden’s policy of reducing the federal deficit by $1.7 trillion had their economic interests in mind, compared to 59% of voters overall. 
  • 74% of Haley voters agree that “We should invest in the middle class to create a solid base for economic growth and opportunity,” while only 26% believe “Cutting taxes for businesses and job creators helps everyone because they invest in jobs for the middle class.”
  • College-educated voters are more likely than non-educated-college voters to think Biden’s policies of establishing a 15% minimum tax on large corporations (56% for college-educated versus 55% overall) and reducing the deficit (64% versus 56%) had their economic interests in mind.
  • Voters in households making more than the median income are slightly more likely than those making less than the median income to support Biden’s policies on deficit reduction (61% versus 56%) and a 15% minimum tax on large corporations (54% versus 55% overall), countering the assumption that higher-income voters oppose higher taxes due to their own financial interests.

This data suggests that many disproportionately wealthy, college-educated voters are not just open to, but are actually more supportive of corporations and the rich paying more in taxes.

How Biden Can Press His Advantage: Banning Junk Fees, Rebuilding Roads and Bridges, and Allowing Medicare to Negotiate Prescription Drug Prices

Voting group

Biden economic policies that most have your interests in mind

Policies that least have your interests in mind

All voters

  • Banning junk fees (69%)
  • Rebuilding roads and bridges (67%)
  • Allowing Medicare to negotiate prescription drug prices (65%)
  • Capping insulin prices at $35 a month for seniors (62%). 
  • Proposed investments in childcare (49%) 
  • Clean energy tax credits (49%)
  • Rebates for home electrification (47%)
  • Student debt cancelation (45%)
  • Rebates for electric vehicles (40%) 

Independent voters

  • Banning junk fees (76%)
  • Rebuilding roads and bridges (72%) 
  • Allowing Medicare to negotiate prescription drug prices (71%)
  • Electrification tax credits (50%)
  • Student debt cancelation (47%) 
  • Rebates for electric vehicles (41%) 

Voters in households earning less than the median income

  • Sending $1,400 checks during the pandemic (67%)
  • Banning junk fees (67%)
  • Allowing Medicare to negotiate prescription drug prices (66%)
  • Rebuilding roads and bridges (64%)
  • Capping insulin prices at $35 a month for seniors (62%)
  • Increasing domestic oil and gas production (51%)
  • Proposing investments in childcare (50%)
  • Canceling $10,000 in student debt (46%)
  • Rebates for electric vehicles (41%)

Voters in households earning more than the median income

  • Banning junk fees (70%)
  • Rebuilding roads and bridges (69%)
  • Reducing the federal deficit by $1.7 trillion (61%)
  • Passing the CHIPS Act (60%)
  • Investing in agricultural supply chains (60%). 
  • Proposing investments in childcare (48%)
  • Passing clean energy tax credits (47%)
  • Canceling $10,000 in student debt (45%)
  • Rebates for home electrification (44%)
  • Rebates for electric vehicles (39%)

Trump Policies

Voting group

Trump economic policies that least have your interests in mind

All voters

  • Rolling back Obama-era regulations (46%)
  • Lowering the corporate tax rate from 35% to 21% (45%)
  • Passing the tax cut bill that lowered corporate tax rates (42%)
  • Withdrawing from the Paris Climate Accords (43%)
  • Proposing raising the retirement age for Medicare (30%)

Democratic voters

  • Lowering the corporate tax rate from 35% to 21% (17%)
  • Rolling back Obama-era regulations (16%)
  • Passing the tax cut bill that lowered corporate tax rates (15%)
  • Withdrawing from the Paris Climate Accords (12%)
  • Proposing raising the retirement age for Medicare (11%)

Non-college-

educated voters 

  • Rolling back Obama-era regulations (47%)
  • Lowering the corporate tax rate from 35% to 21% (46%)
  • Withdrawing from the Paris Climate Accords (44%)
  • Passing the tax cut bill that lowered corporate tax rates (43%)
  • Proposing raising the retirement age for Medicare (31%)

College-educated voters

  • Withdrawing from the TPP and replacing NAFTA with USMCA (43%)
  • Withdrawing from the Paris Climate Accords (42%)
  • Lowering the corporate tax rate from 35% to 21% (42%).
  • Proposing raising the retirement age for Medicare (28%)

Haley voters

  • Withdrawing from the TPP and replacing NAFTA with USMCA (37%).
  • Rolling back Obama-era regulations (35%)
  • Proposing repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act (31%)
  • Lowering the corporate tax rate from 35% to 21% (28%)
  • Withdrawing from the Paris Climate Accords (28%)

Voters in households earning less than the median income

  • Lowering the corporate tax rate from 35% to 21% (45%)
  • Rolling back Obama-era regulations (44%).
  • Passing the tax cut bill that lowered corporate tax rates (40%)
  • Withdrawing from the Paris Climate Accords (39%)
  • Proposing raising the retirement age for Medicare (31%)

Voters in households earning more than the median income

  • Proposing repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act (50%)
  • Withdrawing from the Paris Climate Accords (47%)
  • Rolling back Obama-era regulations (47%)
  • Lowering the corporate tax rate from 35% to 21% (44%)
  • Proposing raising the retirement age for Medicare (30%)

Press Contacts

Alyssa Cass
alyssa@slingshotstrat.com
347-992-5006

Evan Roth Smith
evan@slingshotstrat.com
646-240-0096

Follow us on X for more information and regular polling updates

Obama-Biden MaxDiff Questions: 

Obama-Biden MaxDiff 

[blueprint_class_max_diff_biden_obama] Below are pairs of arguments made by leading politicians. For each pair of quotes, select the one you find most compelling. 

[obama_entire_country] “As president, you represent the entire country, not just those who voted for you. It’s important to listen to and work hard for all Americans, regardless of their political affiliation. When traveling the country, I’ve met hardworking, caring people from all backgrounds who deeply love this nation. To be an effective leader, you must strive to serve everyone, not just a select few.”

[obama_dreams] “I want all Americans to have the opportunity to pursue their dreams and achieve success, regardless of their race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or ability. No one should feel that success is reserved for a particular group or that half the country is locked out of it. I’m fighting for a nation where everyone has a fair chance to thrive.”

[obama_social_security] “I’m fighting for the hardworking people of this country – those on Social Security, veterans, students, soldiers, and everyday Americans who pay their taxes but may not earn enough to get by. If they succeed, I believe our nation will succeed. That’s why I’m asking for your vote and the opportunity to continue serving as your president.”

[obama_values] “The values we hold dear – hard work, fairness, and opportunity – don’t belong to any one group or economic class. These are American values that unite us all, from Wall Street to Main Street, rich and poor alike. As your president, I will fight for every American, regardless of who you vote for, because that’s what true leadership demands.” 

[obama_profits] “As president, your job isn’t just to maximize profits; it’s to ensure that everyone in the country has a fair shot at success. This means considering the workers who get laid off and need retraining, as well as the communities that require support to attract new businesses. Creating an economy that works for all is a critical part of the debate we must have in this election.”

[obama_workers] “When faced with economic challenges, we must always bet on American workers. Time and time again, they have demonstrated their resilience, skills, and ability to adapt to changing circumstances. The strength of our nation lies in the hardworking people who drive innovation and growth every day.”

[biden_defend_democracy] “As I’ve done ever since being elected to office, I ask all of you, without regard to party, to join together and defend democracy. Remember your oath of office to defend against all threats, foreign and domestic.”

[biden_building_american_possibilities] “America’s comeback is building a future of American possibilities; building an economy from the middle out and the bottom up, not the top down; investing in all of America, in all Americans to make every- — sure everyone has a fair shot and we leave no one — no one behind.”

[biden_small_business_manufacturing_growth] “A record 16 million Americans are starting small businesses, and each one is a literal act of hope, with historic job growth and small-business growth for Black and Hispanics and Asian Americans. Eight hundred thousand new manufacturing jobs in America and counting. Where is it written we can’t be the manufacturing capital of the world? We are and we will.”

[biden_buy_america_american_jobs] “Buy America” has been the law of the land since the 1930s. Past administrations, including my predecessor — including some Democrats, as well, in the past — failed to buy American. Not anymore. On my watch, federal projects that you fund — like helping build American roads, bridges, and highways — will be made with American products and built by American workers creating good-paying American jobs.”

[biden_prescription_cost_comparison] “Folks, I’m going to get in trouble for saying that, but any of you want to get in Air Force One with me and fly to Toronto, Berlin, Moscow — I mean, excuse me. Well, even Moscow, probably. And bring your prescription with you, and I promise you, I’ll get it for you for 40 percent the cost you’re paying now. Same company, same drug, same place.”

[biden_cut_deficit_fair_share] “Now let me speak to the question of fundamental fairness for all Americans. I’ve been delivering real results in fiscally responsible ways. We’ve already cut the federal deficit —we’ve already cut the federal deficit by over $1 trillion. I signed a bipartisan deal to cut another trillion dollars in the next decade. It’s my goal to cut the federal deficit another $3 trillion by making big corporations and the very wealthy finally beginning to pay their fair share.”

[biden_billionaire_tax_rates] “No billionaire should pay a lower federal tax rate than a teacher, a sanitation worker, or a nurse.”

[biden_asthma_inhaler_price_cap] “Drug companies have skyrocketed prices for asthma drugs in the United States. Bernie Sanders called them out, and my administration is cracking down on these drug companies. Now, three of the four largest companies are capping the cost of inhalers at $35.”

[biden_trump_roe_overturn_ban]“In 2016, Donald Trump ran to overturn Roe v. Wade. Now, in 2024, he’s running to pass a national ban on a woman’s right to choose. I’m running to make Roe v. Wade the law of the land again, so women have a federal right to choose. Donald Trump doesn’t trust women. I do.”

[biden_trickle_down_trump_jobs_overseas]“Trickle-down economics was supercharged under Trump. On his watch, companies sent American jobs overseas for cheaper labor and imported products. On my watch, we’re creating jobs in America and exporting American products.”

[biden_maga_repeal_aca_attempts] “Trump and MAGA Republicans have tried to repeal the Affordable Care Act over 50 times, and we stopped them every time. Now, House Republicans just released a budget that would repeal it. We will stop them again.”

[biden_trump_tax_cut_debt] “Trump enacted a $2 trillion tax cut that overwhelmingly benefits the very wealthy and biggest corporations. It added more to the national debt than any president has in one term—and he wants to do it again. With your vote this year, we will stop him.”

[biden_trump_terminate_aca_medicare_social_security] “Donald Trump was just one vote away from repealing the Affordable Care Act. Now, he’s determined to try again, running to “terminate” it—and cut Medicare and Social Security while he’s at it. I won’t let it happen.”

[biden_trump_tax_cut_deficit_no_tax_increase] “Donald Trump enacted a $2 trillion tax cut that benefits the very wealthy and biggest corporations and exploded the federal deficit. Under my plan, nobody making less than $400,000 will pay an additional penny in taxes.”

Pro-Biden MaxDiff Questions 

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden] Below are pairs of arguments made by people who oppose Donald Trump. For each pair of arguments, select the one you find most persuasive. 

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_behind_closed_doors] In public, Donald Trump claims to be a champion of the working class, but behind closed doors, while speaking to a group of very rich campaign donors, he told his mega-rich friends that keeping billionaires’ taxes low is his top priority. 

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_proven_advocate] Joe Biden is a proven advocate for the American middle class and doesn’t just look out for very rich Americans and billionaires.

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_yachts] Donald Trump is a candidate for people who own yachts and multiple homes, not those who work hard every day to make ends meet. 

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_ultra_rich] Joe Biden knows that the strength of the economy should not be measured by how the ultra-rich are doing but instead by how the middle class is doing. That’s why he’s investing in bringing back well-paying American jobs. 

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_sold_out] Joe Biden is a family man who puts hard-working Americans first; Donald Trump puts his rich friends ahead of the American people, and he’s consistently sold out the American middle class to benefit himself. 

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_role_model] Donald Trump is uncommitted to his family and has repeatedly demonstrated that he is not a good role model for younger Americans; Joe Biden is a respectable family man who has acted with dignity and honor throughout his time in public life. 

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_con_man] Donald Trump is a selfish con man who is always looking out for himself and trying to make a buck rather than acting in the interests of the American people.   

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_negotiate] When Donald Trump was president, he tried to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which would’ve meant eliminating protections for pre-existing conditions. Joe Biden has taken on big pharmaceutical companies to lower the price of prescription drugs.

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_national_debt] Donald Trump blew up the national debt so that he could pass a huge tax cut for his corporate donors and rich buddies. President Biden has reduced the deficit and supported tax policies that make sure our debt is under control.     

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_china] Donald Trump is looking out for himself, not the American people. He and his family have taken billions of dollars from foreign governments like China and Saudi Arabia. Joe Biden is making billionaires like Trump finally pay their fair share of taxes. 

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_grew_up_rich] Donald Trump grew up rich, living in a penthouse in New York City. He doesn’t understand what it’s like to work hard to make ends meet. Joe Biden’s father was a car salesman in Scranton, Pennsylvania, and never forgot where he came from. 

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_billionaire_tax_cuts] Trump lowered the tax bills of Americans making more than $4.5m a year by more than double a typical family’s annual income. As a result, the average income tax rate for billionaires is just 8.2 percent —lower than what a firefighter, teacher, or nurse usually pays.  

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_corporate_tax_cuts] Trump slashed big corporations’ tax rates in half — during Trump’s last year in office, 55 of the biggest companies in America made $40 billion in profits and paid $0 in federal income taxes. 

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_cut_social_programs] Donald Trump has threatened to cut social security and Medicare. In a recent interview, Donald Trump said “there a lot you can do…in terms of cutting” Social Security and Medicare. As president, Biden will always protect Social Security and Medicare.

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_more_corporate_giveaways] Donald Trump wants to hand out an additional $100 billion in corporate tax giveaways every single year. Meanwhile, Joe Biden is focused on supporting small businesses and working families, not lining the pockets of huge multinational companies.

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_fair_tax_rates] President Biden believes no billionaire should pay a lower tax rate than a firefighter, a teacher, a sanitation worker, or a nurse. Everyone should pay their fair share, with the wealthiest Americans and big corporations finally contributing what they rightfully owe.

[blueprint_class_max_diff_pro_biden_no_tax_hikes_middle_class] Under President Biden’s tax plan, nobody earning less than $400,000 will pay an additional penny in federal taxes. Joe Biden is looking out for the middle class, not the millionaires and billionaires.