Voters Overwhelmingly Support President Biden’s Executive Actions on Immigration and the Border

In short, President Biden is struggling with an electorate that views him as to their left on immigration, but his recent executive orders are welcomed by voters, and the moves meet them where they are—especially with the key constituencies he will need to win over by November.

June 20, 2024

In the lead-up to President Biden’s new executive action to secure the southern border, Blueprint polled voters on the issue, the various components of the sweeping policy, and how it will impact the 2024 election. 

The poll shows that voters support President Biden’s decision and that immigration is a top concern in this election. Voters are worried, however, that Democrats aren’t doing enough to address immigration issues and the border—not that their policies on the issue are overly restrictive. 

In short, President Biden is struggling with an electorate that views him as to their left on immigration, but his recent executive orders are welcomed by voters, and the moves meet them where they are—especially with the key constituencies he will need to win over by November.  

  • When voters who are not planning to vote for Biden are asked to select the two issues that most closely describe why they won’t vote for him, Biden’s handling of immigration and the border is selected as the top concern (60%), beating out his handling of inflation (53%) and his age (24%). 
  • Among independents, 56% select immigration and the border as their top reason for not voting for Biden, while 38% say inflation and 34% choose his age.
  • Notably, Latino respondents were equally likely to list immigration as a reason they would not vote for Biden as white respondents; 63% of both groups selected it as their top reason.

Voters Support President Biden’s Executive Actions on the Border

Before President Biden officially announced his executive action on the border, only 31% of voters had heard about the president’s proposals. 

But after reading neutral descriptions of Biden’s immigration executive actions (pulled from media coverage), voters overwhelmingly support Biden’s planned executive order to expedite the removal of migrants who officials believe are unlikely to be able to stay in the country. 

62% of voters support this policy, with 22% opposed. Support is relatively high across all partisan groups, with net support of +18 among Democrats, +38 among independents, and +62 among Republicans. Among voters ages 18-44, net support is +15; among Latino voters, net support is +41; and among Black voters, net support is +23.

Independent voters say that the executive order would make them more likely to support President Biden (28% more supportive, 16% less supportive).

  • 55% of Black voters say it would not affect their support, while 28% indicate it would make them more likely to support Biden, and 17% say it would make them less likely to support Biden. 
  • 51% of Latino voters say the proposal would not affect their support, while 31% say it would make them more likely to support Biden, and 19% indicate it would make them less likely to support Biden.
  • While voters ages 18-44 do support the policy, those who might change their vote based on immigration are less supportive. 40% said it would not affect their support, while 25% said it would make them more likely to support Biden, and 34% said it would make them less likely to support Biden. 

Voters also support another aspect of the executive order, which gives Biden the authority to “shut down” the border if there are too many illegal border crossings in a single day. This policy is supported by 45% of all voters with 32% opposed, and 22% of voters not sure. Net support was strongest among independents, with a majority in support (+26), followed by +19 among Republicans and Democrats divided (-1). Among Latino voters, net support was +36. 

Immigration is a Top Reason People Aren’t Voting for Biden, and Voters Want Him to Talk About it More

When respondents who said they wouldn’t vote for Biden in 2024 were asked what most closely describes why, 60% chose his handling of immigration and the border (respondents were allowed to select up to two reasons). Women are much more likely to list immigration and the border as a reason not to vote for Biden than men; 69% of female respondents not voting for Biden listed immigration as the reason why, compared to 53% of male respondents. Latino respondents were just as likely to list immigration as a reason they would not vote for Biden as white respondents—63% of both groups named it as their primary reason for not supporting Biden. And the majority (56%) of independents who do not plan to vote for Biden this fall listed immigration and the border as the reason why. 

 

When respondents were asked what issues that they would be most interested in hearing President Biden discuss, immigration and the border came in second (33%) after inflation and prices (50%).

Before Hearing About the Executive Action, Voters See Biden To Their Left on Immigration and the Border 

Before being informed about the executive orders, 50% of respondents said that Biden was more liberal than themselves on immigration; 33% said he was close to their views, and 17% said he was more conservative than them. 

  • Among voters ages 18-44, 41% said Biden was more liberal than then on immigration, compared to 30% who said he was close to their views and 28% who said he was more conservative. 
  • Among Black voters, 27% said Biden was more liberal than they are, while 66% said he was close to their views, and 8% said he was more conservative. 
  • Among Latinos, 35% said Biden was more liberal than them, 44% said he was close to their views, and 21% said he was more conservative. 
  • 50% of independents said that Biden was more liberal than them, while 28% said he was close to their views, and 21% said he was more conservative. 

Overwhelmingly, Voters Support Restricting Asylum

When asked whether the United States should take in more, fewer, or about the same amount of refugees and asylum seekers, voters by a 33-point margin prefer reducing the number of asylum seekers and refugees admitted to the country. 

Only 16% support allowing in more refugees and asylum seekers. Roughly a third of the electorate (34%) support taking in about the same amount of refugees and asylum seekers as we do now), while close to a majority (49%) support taking in fewer refugees and asylum seekers.

  • Among independent voters, 44% favor fewer asylum seekers, 42% favor maintaining current levels, and 14% favor increasing the number of asylum seekers admitted. 
  • Among voters ages 18-44, 40% think the US should take in fewer asylum seekers, 35% think it should take in the same amount as it does currently, and 25% think it should take in more. 
  • 62% of Latino voters want to take in fewer refugees and asylum seekers, compared to 38% who want to maintain current levels. 
  • Among Black voters, 62% want to maintain current levels; 12% want to reduce the number of asylum seekers admitted, and 26% want to admit more asylum seekers and refugees. 
  • 42% of women said the US should admit about the same number of refugees and asylum seekers as it does now, compared to 45% who said it should admit fewer refugees and 13% who said it should admit more. Among men, 20% favor admitting more refugees, 26% prefer keeping levels as they are now, and 54% favor admitting fewer refugees. 

Similarly, a majority (54%) of voters want asylum rules to be stricter, while 34% say they should stay the same. Only 13% of voters want to see looser asylum rules.

  • 56% of independent voters want stricter asylum rules, while 29% prefer to keep the current rules and 15% support looser rules. 
  • Among voters ages 18-44, 42% want stricter asylum rules, compared to 22% who want looser rules and 36% who favor the status quo. 
  • Among Black voters, 28% prefer stricter asylum rules, 9% want looser rules, and 63% want the rules kept as they are. 
  • 57% of Latino voters support keeping the current asylum rules, compared to 42% who want stricter rules and 1% who prefer looser rules. 
  • 47% of women said that rules for granting asylum or refugee status should be made stricter, compared to 41% who want to keep them the same as they are now and 12% who prefer looser rules. Among men, 61% favor making the rules stricter, compared to 26% who favor keeping the current rules and 13% who support loosening the rules. 

PRESS CONTACTS

Alyssa Cass
alyssa@slingshotstrat.com
347-992-5006

Evan Roth Smith
evan@slingshotstrat.com
646-240-0096

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ABOUT THE POLL

Blueprint surveyed an online sample of 1,006 voters from June 1 to June 2. The survey was conducted in English, and its margin of error is ±7.1 percentage points. Full toplines can be found here and crosstabs are available upon request.